19e rencontres npp unesco

Number 32, 2010 - African Studies Centre Leiden,Main shared menu

Oct 23,  · Les 19e Rencontres Internationales sur les Nouvelles Pratiques Philosophiques s’attacheront à explorer, dans les différents chantiers, ce «. Apr 22,  · Les 19e Rencontres Internationales sur les Nouvelles Pratiques Philosophiques s'attacheront à explorer, dans les différents chantiers, ce «temps pour penser» et ce «temps de la pensée».

Nous proposerons sur ces deux jours des communications, des ateliers pratiques, des démonstrations d'ateliers, des conférences plénières. Les 19e Rencontres Internationales sur les Nouvelles Pratiques Philosophiques s'attacheront à explorer, dans les différents chantiers, ce «temps pour penser» et ce «temps de la pensée». Nous proposerons sur ces deux jours des communications, des ateliers pratiques, des démonstrations d'ateliers, des conférences plénières.


The nominees will receive a diploma of honour. All participants will be registered in the Artistic Fund of our Art Library. Remaining days to send your entry: It is divided into 5 age categories , , , , and as well as a medical-social category open to children and young people with disability aged from 3 to Only one entry is accepted per individual. The identification label must be correctly filled out and secured to the back of each creation glue, avoid to use tape.

Labels that are illegible or incorrectly filled out will not be taken into account. The participant might attach an explanatory text onto the creation describing the creative process. Only creations on a flat surface are accepted no three-dimensional creations and they must be on flexible material unframed, no wood or carton board. The maximum dimensions are x 75 cm.

The creations must be sent to: Back in November , your husband was asking in his syndicated column: Since then, humankind has added the equivalent of one full China or 5.

This is of course a theoretical view that ecosystemic collapses might well postpone indefinitely. This is not without precedents: However, we know that civilized humans are supposed to act more responsibly. Some optimists have pretended that if children ceased to die and if women got educated, stabilization of the world population would necessarily ensue.

This is not what French Canada experienced! As long as the Catholic religion was taken seriously here, university graduates giving birth to four or more children were not exceptional. The comparison between French-speaking Catholics and Anglo-Protestants living side by side shows what considerable difference in fertility social pressure can make for generations.

Taking into account that many traditions expect all women to reproduce which was never the case here, how can you make sure that your interventions do not exacerbate problems? Dying at two from contagion, or at ten from battlefield wounds, or from complications after being gang raped? If we sound not politically correct, please consider that the Canadian experience offers some terrible lessons on survival in very harsh context.

Kemp Scientific American September With access to modern energy and imported food, the practice stopped, but it is a reminder that one can be left with no easy alternative when forced to live under "triage" conditions. We trust that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will favour lucidity and long term planning and responsibility over unfunded theories and taboos that increase the suffering of innocent victims.

Thank you for having spoken out last February 17 th and helping to prevent Chris Smith from scoring too many points in his utterly irresponsible crusade. Cela n'est pas surprenant, mais cela n'est pas acceptable et vous devez le dire haut et fort!

Monsieur le Premier Ministre,. Plaintes sur le recensement: L'avortement tue tous les jours parce que les avortements sont faits dans des conditions catastrophiques. Pour beaucoup de femmes, l'avortement est un moyen contraceptif. Depuis Lincoln, on ne peut plus invoquer l'Ancien Testament pour justifier l'esclavage chez nos voisins du Sud; mieux, depuis Johnson, on ne peut plus le faire pour exclure en se basant sur la couleur de la peau.

Monsieur le Premier ministre,. Un cas que j'aimerais vous raconter Depuis longtemps nous intervenons pour demander un encadrement qui n'est toujours pas en place. Le dossier ci-joint en fait foi. Les revendications de la Ligue portent alors principalement sur: De fil en aiguille et de reportages. Fonction publique et para-publique: Vos tergiversations concernant le port de signes religieux dans la fonction publique et para-publique me scandalisent.

Lettre de Johanne Durocher. Merci Mme Jobin pour votre aide. Nous en avons grandement besoin. Depuis maintenant 1 mois personne ne sait ou sont Nathalie et ses enfants. Le gouvernement une fois de temps en temps pose un geste pour avoir l'air de faire quelque chose. Rapatriez Madame Nathalie Morin et ses trois enfants au Canada. Quand on y pense, la somme de , Secourez les caisses de retraite. Pourquoi cette aide ne s'appliquerait-elle pas aussi aux caisses de retraite qui sont devenues victimes de ce papier?

PPP et bien public. Projet de loi C Dans sa recommandation no. Malheureusement, 45 ans plus tard, cette aberration se poursuit et s'amplifie. Vous avez bien lu: J r , and Rosser, Walter. Le cas particulier du foulard islamique nous servira d'exemple. Davis copie de ma lettre ci-jointe. Quant au personnel et aux visiteurs, on peut supposer que les proportions sont analogues.

The APRM process is generally not well integrated into other national development planning processes, debates and oversight mechanisms, and seems doomed to become little more than a cosmetic exercise without effect in the real world of policy and decisionmaking. Africa; Burkina Faso; Madagascar; economic development; poverty reduction. This article looks at the argument for a correspondence between economic growth and poverty reduction.

It questions whether a link between economic growth and poverty reduction can be established. The general picture in Africa provides no convincing evidence of this link. Two countries in Africa, Burkina Faso and Madagascar, seem on the surface to exemplify the link. Indeed, it is probable that an increase in poverty contributed to the crisis in Madagascar. Furthermore, there are signs that in both countries poverty strategies are increasingly giving way to Poverty Reduction Growth Facility programmes, closely related to former structural adjustment loans.

The authors conclude that analysing poverty strategies through Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers does not help to resolve the uncertainty, since these strategies assume a priori the existence of a link between economic growth and poverty reduction. Moreover, collection and interpretation of poverty data could be biased, with the World Bank, for example, having an interest in showing improvements in poverty reduction in Africa.

Finally, the paucity of data needs, at the very least, to be recognized as a major problem. Africa; Mozambique; community participation; research; education. The article explores the roots of community-based-research CBR in Africa. The main questions are: How to access the knowledge produced and circulated within communities and make them subject of teaching in schools? Can we derive methodological questions that could be related specifically to the African context from the CBR as it is being implemented?

The exposition of these questions is illustrated with examples focused on education. Mozambique is used as an example to discuss the possibility of merging local and universal knowledge through community based research which informs curricula changes in primary schools. Africa; indigenous technology; tools; iron forging; metalworking industry; precolonial period. Combustion was pivotal in the heat-mediated process of indigenous metalworking in precolonial Africa. For such combustion to be initiated, a consistent supply of air was essential and because bellows generated the air that precipitated the chemical reactions integral to smelting and forging, they were thus critical apparatus in these pursuits.

This paper deals with a 'forgotten' but essential aspect of indigenous metalworking in sub-Saharan Africa the bellows. It discusses their chronology, distribution, technical parameters and sociocultural dimensions. It achieves this by melding multiple strands of evidence from archaeology and its cognate disciplines.

Scientific content creation and dissemination: Africa; Internet; universities; publishing. Africa has made some strides in accessing the Internet over the last decade or so and it has managed to upload considerable information on to the Internet in the areas of business, information technology, connectivity and politics. But there is a missing link in scientific and technological information content creation and dissemination.

Several proposals have been made to narrow the gap between developed countries and Africa in terms of uploading information on to the Internet. Besides the growing public information and the presence of commercial web, content generated from African universities is expanding.

Internet connectivity in Africa and most of the developing world initially took root mainly in academic institutions and among academics. In some parts of Africa, universities were pioneer users of e-mail and Internet access and there is very little evidence that their interest in ICTs has waned; rather, it is growing.

Most African universities with full Internet connectivity have the potential of playing a critical role in content creation and dissemination through electronic publishing because of their research interests. This paper addresses the problems that Africa currently faces in developing content for the Internet and in disseminating that information. The paper looks at institutions that have the potential for creating content for the Internet. It focuses mainly on universities and research institutions' capacities to take on this role.

The paper also addresses other issues of access like limited bandwidth, unreliable electricity and communication transmission services, lack of technical expertise, high costs, etc. Jean-Philippe Colin and Philip Woodhouse.

Over the past two decades, a wave of proposals for land tenure reform in many African countries has raised questions about land markets as a means of allocating land that have profound political and economic implications.

This collection of articles explores the nature of land markets in Africa. An introductory chapter by Jean-Philippe Colin and Philip Woodhouse discusses the emergence and dynamics of land markets in Africa. Admos Chimhowu and Philip Woodhouse deal with a 'vernacular' land market in Svosve communal lands, Zimbabwe, following the 'Fast Track' land reforms of Sitko explores the ways in which efforts to expand private land tenure, coupled with the continued centrality of customary land administration in Zambia, produce a fractured system of land governance in which localized markets for land emerge but are forced to operate in a clandestine manner.

Using the case of Nandom in the Upper West Region of Ghana, Carola Lentz traces the history of debates on land transfers in northern Ghana and discusses ways in which African and European views on land tenure influenced and instrumentalized each other. Kojo Sebastian Amanor is concerned with the contestation of rights to land and labour and the construction of customary land tenure in the forest of Ghana from the 19th century to the present. Africa; cinema; archives; conservation of cultural heritage; conference papers form ; The topic addressed at the conference was 'Africa and the moving image: Guido Convents gives an overview of current issues in African moving images and their preservation.

Vivian Bickford-Smith discusses African perspectives on film as evidence, film as history and film in history. In an article especially written for this issue, Peter Davis relates his experience with filming in South Africa and discusses his collection of Africana documents. South African Journal of International Affairs: Africa; political systems; separation of powers; executive power; responsibility. This article presents an overview of African regime types and the limits on restraining executive power, institutionally as well as through party politics.

Particular attention is given to the lack of separation between the legislative and executive branch of government in most countries of Africa and the great powers assigned to presidents. Both issues imply a lack of possibilities to hold the executive accountable, or what G.

O'Donnell called 'horizontal accountability'. Moreover, the pattern of one-party dominance, which can be related in part to concurrent elections for the presidency and parliament, strengthens executive power and implies a low incidence of government coalitions.

The analysis points to the limits of existing constitutional instruments to restrain executive power, such as censure, impeachment and presidential term limits. The author argues that donors should use their considerable agenda power to assist local pressures for reform. Tyler Revolutionising local politics? Tyler Dickovick - In: Burkina Faso; Ghana; Uganda; political change; decentralization; local government reform; traditional rulers; State-society relationship. This article compares three African countries whose attempts to transform local governance in the s were among the most dramatic, particularly in rural areas: Despite surface similarities, especially in the establishment of local 'people's defence councils' or 'resistance councils', the three experiments had quite different outcomes, as a function both of 26 AFRICA - GENERAL antecedent conditions in State-society relations and of regimes' choices.

Regimes' choices between confrontation, coexistence, and the construction of new relations with social forces resulted in different degrees of local political change. The 'revolutionary' local experiments provide insight into a general theory of African politics, in which States' transformational powers in rural areas remain circumscribed by entrenched local forces. This article examines some African specifically Zulu , Indian and Chinese patterns of energy healing in order to demonstrate some similarities.

All these types of helaing accept, as a given, the existence of a universal energy to which everyone has access. All extol a form of healing energy and some form of conscious breathwork, with emphasis on ancestors, meditation and movement in African, Indian and Chinese healing patterns respectively.

Illness is viewed as a disruption or stagnation of energy patterns which need continual channelling, mobilization, balancing and harmonization to achieve optimal health. Africa; South Africa; healing rites; healers; African religions; Zulu. Discerning visitors to Africa typically have an 'ancestral-roots' experience on encountering an essential humanity and communal spirituality which may seem lacking in their home communities.

This is scarcely surprising when it is considered that converging lines of evidence from various scientific disciplines all point consistently to Africa as the cradle of civilization for all humanity.

In its original, essential and literal meaning, psychology is concerned with the breath, energy, consciousness, soul or spirit of life that leaves a person at death and continues in some other form.

Such an essential and spiritual form of psychology, still practised internationally, has its roots in African communal spirituality and spiritual community. Today, such reality remains concretely apparent in South Africa in the experience of the Zulu diviner of being "breathed" by the ancestors during the divine healing process ukububula kwedlozi and in the mobilizing of spiritual healing power umoya by African Indigenous Church faith healers.

Africa; disarmament; firearms; African agreements. The spread of arms and the resulting armed violence undermine good governance in Africa more than in any other continent. The main reason for the subregional approach is that Africa is the region in the world worst-hit by unrestrained arms availability. This has devastating consequences that imperil human security and threaten the continent's achievement of development goals. Africa; hydrocarbon policy; petroleum; exports; economic development; governance.

Commentaire de la part de Thomas Sterner p. Africa; philosophy; indigenous knowledge. The author explores some of the ramifications that the Western discourse of postmodernism may have on the notion of rationality in African philosophy and indigenous African knowledge systems in general. He concludes by arguing that the merits of such a discourse include its acknowledgment of alternative forms of reasoning and their accompanying cultural expressions; its insistence that knowledge production is not independent of moral and political value; its grounding of rationality in social relations; and its recognition of the role of commitment, caring and feeling in rationality - all of which speak of the true essence of indigenous African knowledge systems.

South Africa; higher education; educational philosophy. There are historical, institutional and cultural differences that influence teaching and learning in South African universities.

There are also different beliefs about how relevance and responsiveness are constituted, and about the pedagogical principles that should apply in transferring knowledge. In recognition of these differences, the present authors argue that an African educational discourse can make a significant contribution to teaching and learning in South African universities.

They suggest that educating for communal life and ubuntu are crucial to traditional African educational thought and practice. African Journal of Biblical Studies: Africa; proverbs; Bible; research. For some years, Old Testament scholarship has seen a methodological paradigm shift. This article discusses some aspects of their interpretations.

It first outlines how Old Testament scholarship relates Africa and the Old Testament on a more general level. Then it presents recent examples of how Old Testament proverb scholarship makes use of African proverbs, focusing on research by L. Nare Burkina Faso , P. Nzambi Democratic Republic of Congo , and M. The author concludes with an assessment of the current situation regarding the use of African proverbs in Old Testament scholarship, arguing that there is room for fruitful interaction between the two areas of study.

Africa; economic conditions; economic recession; public finance; global economy. Africa; underdevelopment; national income. This article takes a fresh look at estimates of African country incomes.

It subjects the available datasets to tests of accuracy, reliability, and volatility, and finds that there is very little to explain in terms of diversity of income between countries. With the exception of some resource-rich enclaves, a few island States, and South Africa, the income of one African economy is not meaningfully different from another. It is found that the majority of African countries should for all practical purposes be considered to have the same income level.

The article therefore concludes that it is futile to use GDP estimates to prove a link between income today and existence of pro-growth institutions in the past, and recommends a searching reconsideration of the almost exclusive use of GDP as a measure of relative development.

Africa; language policy; indigenous languages. This article reflects on the state of language policies in postcolonial Africa at the time of the millennium, with a focus on efforts to promote the use of African languages in higher domains such as education.

The evidence presented supports the argument that language policies in most African countries have succeeded only in creating space, on paper at least, for the promotion of the indigenous languages in higher domains. However, they have failed to achieve the objectives for which they were designed and the ties with inherited colonial language policies have not yet been severed.

The article points out that language policy failure stems from the interplay of various ideologies, among them the ideology of development vs. The article deconstructs these ideologies and calls for a more pragmatic, decentralized, marketoriented approach to status planning for African languages, if the masses who speak these languages are to participate actively in the social, political and economic development of the African continent.

Dar es Salaam University Press, cop. Africa; Ethiopia; Malawi; Tanzania; Uganda; peasantry; subsistence economy; ethics; conference papers form ; This book contains revised versions of papers presented at a conference held at the University of Dar es Salaam on August , entitled "Contemporary Perspectives on African Moral Economy".

Attention was focused on two main aspects of peasantry life: Starting point for the discussion was Goran Hyden's concept of 'economy of affection', which focuses on the behavioural characteristics of African peasants. Part 1, Objective and methodology of African moral economy, contains an introduction by Kazuhiko Sugimura, and chapters by Goran Hyden The economy of affection: Part 2, Moral economy on environment, deals with the way African communities employed the ideas of sharing moral economy in handling their scarce resources Fanuel Shechambo on the case of 'ngitili' conservation areas in Shinyanga Region, Tanzania; S.

Maghimbi on water, nomadism and the subsistence ethic in Maasailand Kiteto District ; Abu Mvungi on water management for irrigation in Mwanga District. Part 3, Moral economy of labour, focuses on the African traditional method of labour exchange for food security Deborah Fahy Bryceson on 'ganyu' labour in rural Malawi; Soichiro Shiraishi on labour exchange among the Sabiny in Uganda; Kazuhiko Sugimura on 'kibarua' employment in Sagara society.

Part 4 contains two examples from rural Ethiopia, an agricultural community Keiichiro Matsumura and a pastoral community Hiroshi Matsuda. Rutatora and Stephen J. Nindi on the Matengo of Mbingi District, Tanzania. Finally, the contemporary relevance of moral economy is discussed by A.

Africa; access to information; information technology. African Journal on Conflict Resolution: Africa; right of intervention; African Union. The right to intervene under the AU Act is a radical departure from, and in stark contrast with, the principle of State sovereignty and non-intervention, the very cornerstones of the erstwhile OAU. Although intervention has traditionally been opposed by African States and regarded as imperialism, under the AU Act AU Member States have themselves accepted sovereignty not as a shield but as a responsibility where the AU has the right to intervene to save lives from mass atrocity crimes.

Today, human rights are not a purely domestic concern and sovereignty cannot shield repressive States. Thus, if a State is unable or unwilling to protect its people, the responsibility falls on other States. What is certain is that the thresholds for intervention are serious crimes under international law, which are subject to universal jurisdiction. Therefore, Article 4 h of the AU Act can be viewed as providing for statutory intervention in form of enforcement action by consent to prevent or halt mass atrocity crimes.

However, yet to be answered is how to reconcile the AU right to intervene with the provisions of the UN Charter, especially where the AU exercises military intervention. Nonetheless, the AU should reduce the need for costly intervention and focus more on preventive strategies. Africa; information technology; human rights.

This paper draws out the potentials of information and communications technologies ICTs for supporting the cause of social justice in Africa.

It draws on the experience of Fahamu - a not-for profit organization with offices in South Africa and the UK - of using ICTs for delivering distance learning programmes for human rights organizations using a mixture of CD-ROM, e-mail moderation and workshop-based learning.

The potentials for delivering similar courses using handheld computers with built-in mobile phones are explored.

The paper describes the development of 'Pambazuka News', a weekly electronic news and discussion forum for social justice that has grown in three years from a subscriber base of to more than 70, each week. The paper argues that technology is a manifestation of social relations, reflecting the power and values of those who use it.

Globalisation and African cultural heritage erosion: Africa; cultural heritage; cultural policy; indigenous knowledge; development; globalization. Globalization has had both negative and positive impact on the development and preservation of cultural heritage in Africa.

However, this article argues that African countries need not necessarily be disadvantaged by the unfolding globalization process if they adopt developmental policies that are rooted in their own cultural heritage, including African Indigenous Knowledge Systems IKS. This is the result of the worldwide increasing realization that culture constitutes a fundamental dimension of the development process.

It helps to strengthen the independence, sovereignty and identity of nations. Moreover, economic growth and development have frequently been conceived in quantitative terms, without taking into consideration their necessary qualitative dimensions, i.

African scholars and heritage managers should push to make sustainable utilization of IKS for sustainable development the next global agenda after information technology.

They need to maintain a delicate balance by thinking globally in an era when science and technology have shortened distance and united cultures, while at the same time stimulating the development of national and local agendas in relation to cultural and IKS policies. It is important that African countries first cooperate among themselves.

This cooperation can only be meaningful if it begins with what is already there, i. These indigenous cultural potentialities could be revived and adapted to the demands of present-day science and technology for sustainable development and local community livelihoods. Africa; nationalism; national liberation movements; nation building; development; speeches form. The national question has always been closely associated with the history of oppressed or colonized peoples. In Africa, for much of the twentieth century, it has involved asserting one's humanity, acquiring independence, and maintaining the unity and territorial integrity of the new State.

Nationalism generally sought to separate the national from the social question, which was seen as secondary. The tensions between the "national" and "social" questions in Africa, between race and class, between vertical and horizontal inequalities, are the underlying theme of this paper, which is a slightly revised version of a lecture delivered in honour of the late Harold Wolpe in October The author reviews the agenda of the African nationalist movements and identifies items that are still relevant or have a progressive thrust; examines how various issues on the nationalist agenda, in particular de-racialization, the quest for national unity and economic development, were addressed; and discusses potential or incipient factors, such as poverty and the social crisis, the rise of ethnonationalism, the new waves of democratization and social demand, pushing a new agenda in which the social question is prominent.

Given the task that the nationalists had set for themselves, it was unrealistic under the circumstances to have expected a revolutionary outcome. For many countries in Africa it is now imperative to move on to addressing the emerging social question, partly because in some countries considerable achievements have been made in addressing the national question while, in others where the national question remains unresolved, many of the problems complicating matters require active socioeconomic policies to address them.

In both cases, the new agenda will require new actors, new coalitions and new thinking. Africa; science education; indigenous knowledge. There are many factors e. This type of knowledge - often referred to as 'prior knowledge' - has been found to underpin the quality of learning in a significant way, by either facilitating or inhibiting learning.

Africa; place names; colonialism; decolonization. Op die kontinent van Afrika sou 'uhuru', die Afrikawoord vir 'vryheid' en in die jare van de-kolonisasie veral die wekroep vir die afwerping van koloniale onderdrukking deur die verkryging van nasionale onafhanklikheid, en Afrikanisering lei tot 'n loswoel uit die kolonialistiese juk deur die landname wat deur die kolonialiseerders aan die gebiede deur hulle ingepalm, gegee is, te verwerp, inheems aanvaarbare name in die plek daarvan te stel en gesag te bekom en veral selfrespek terug te wen.

Die kwessies wat in hierdie artikel ter sprake kom, is: Africa; publishing; electronic media; periodicals. Electronic publishing has enabled the publisher of scholarly journals to offer an enhanced high quality product, but one that comes bundled with unsatisfactory conditions: Dissatisfied with the terms and limitations of traditional journals, individuals, groups and organizations have opted to advance a different model of journal.

The open access movement may be seen as part of a critical trend that seeks to break the stranglehold of commercial expropriation of information. Open access journals are freely available for reading, copying, and disseminating. With growing support from many different quarters, the challenger to the 3. This paper covers the rise of open access journals and examines the economics of the 'author pays' business model. Notwithstanding the appreciable benefits to readers, the impetus to overturn deeply entrenched traditions must also overcome significant barriers.

These include the practice of the academic reward system, funding issues, perceptions about quality and integrity, as well as the fundamental problem of the digital divide.

While the open access model also presents a serious threat to scholarly society publications, all initiatives to promote visibility of African journals should be explored. Africa; indigenous knowledge; higher education. This paper argues that while some academic efforts have been made to fulfil the need to indigenize African universities, these efforts have been greatly overshadowed by the hegemony that neoliberal capitalistic practices have at contemporary African universities.

The postcolonial African university has become more oriented towards the promotion and dissemination of the values of neoliberal capitalism. In this orientation, African indigenous values are only appealed to in order to domesticate capitalistic economic practices in Africa. It is also argued that African universities have adopted a Eurocentric approach in their academic orientation at the expense of African indigenous knowledge systems and values.

In so doing, the salient presumption is that African indigenous knowledge systems and values have nothing to contribute to the transformation of African societies. Another argument that is advanced in this paper is that the reconstruction of the postcolonial African university is only plausible on the premise that these universities actively appropriate African indigenous knowledge systems and values in theory and practice. French-speaking Africa; France; national security; reform; defence policy.

This article investigates why Francophone Africa, by and large, has 'missed the boat' of security sector transformation. It examines the factors that have contributed to the dearth of much-needed harmonization between the democratization of political systems in African States since the s and the governance of their security sectors. It argues that in nearly all aspects of security sector management, Francophone African States remained prisoners of French African security policies many facets of which did not conform to sound security sector governance principles or convey these to African political or military leaders.

The evidence indicates that Francophone Africa's security establishments, the armies in particular, were conceived as overseas appendices and instruments of French security policies both before and after the adjustments made necessary by the major changes in the s. Throughout, unsavoury relations cultivated with Francophone elites were used to legitimize and perpetuate this set up.

Ultimately African leaders are responsible for the absence of serious security sector transformation. However, this legacy of rampant 37 AFRICA - GENERAL praetorianism, culture of dependence on and modelling France, the absence of a tradition of institutionalized civilian supremacy, democratic accountability, and transparency help explain why genuine security sector transformation has eluded nearly all Francophone African States.

Recommendations are proffered to seize the opportunity of the recent change of French political personnel and rhetoric about Africa to finally engage in genuine security sector transformation.

Africa; peacekeeping operations; UN. Post-Cold War turbulence between and led to huge UN peacekeeping operations and the cost of these operations increased six-fold over this period. However, as the number of peacekeepers declined sharply towards the end of the s, critics were quick to contend that the UN Security Council had been lax in carrying out its mandate and responsibility to maintain international peace and security.

Specifically, it was argued that the Security Council had limited responsibility and commitment to deploy Blue Helmets in sizeable numbers on the African continent where involvement in conflicts had been among the UN's most challenging endeavours. The tide has turned in recent years and today the UN deploys more peacekeepers in international peacekeeping theatres than ever before, the majority on African soil.

What does this imply with regard to the political will of the international community to invest in or contribute to peacekeeping operations in Africa? Furthermore, where does this leave important African roleplayers such as the AU and the envisaged African Standby Force? Against the above background this article aims at providing a better understanding of UN peacekeeping operations with special reference to African peacekeeping challenges.

The tide has turned in recent years and today the UN deploys more peacekeepers in international peacekeeping theatres than ever before the majority on African soil. Africa; philosophy; globalization; social justice.

Ultra-liberalism and globalization are carried by large international economic organizations. Since the second half of the twentieth century, they have been the vectors of an increasing injustice and have widened inequalities between rich and poor countries, between North and South. These three meta-narratives - ultra-liberalism, globalization and in justice mobilize a growing number of intellectuals. The main question is: Through the concept of Ubuntu restorative justice , South Africa and African philosophy contribute, in terms of practices and theory, to the debate in political philosophy in which justice is central.

In theorizing the concept of Ubuntu, African philosophy could bring the first important contribution of the African continent to the philosophical - or multi-field debate, which largely exceeds the African dimension. By recalling the history and bonds between Afro-Americans and the South African Renaissance, this text develops the concept of Ubuntu and suggests how this concept makes it possible to weave - or reweave - relations at the planetary level rather than deepen wounds.

By exceeding the concept of punitive justice, we can imagine globalization not as an economic apartheid but as a world made of the recognition of one humanity equal in dignity. Revisiting the traditional African cultural framework of ubuntuism: Nyaumwe, Queeneth Mkabela - In: This paper re-examines the culturally located social schema of 'ubuntuism', a moral philosophy of traditional African societies.

A romanticism of ubuntuism in the practice of cultural values is discussed, drawing examples from successful areas of cooperative activities. Next, the negative effects of Westernization are examined, showing that the values initially perceived as modernization later turned to be a meachnism that promoted individualism, greed, and the erosion of traditional African cultural values, leading to moral decadence in some citizens.

They further argue for the resuscitation of ubuntuism in the young generation through the promotion of cooperation among students and the learning of subjects within local contexts. The conclusion looks at some challenges that future discourse on ubuntuism could focus on, as well as the implications of the paper for African educators. Africa; Nigeria; international migration; capital movements; citizenship; State-society relationship.

The rise in the volume of known global foreign worker remittances to countries of origin has sparked considerable academic and policy interest. Much attention has been paid to the assumed 'development' potential of these financial remittances, an approach which encapsulates the tendency to envisage the consequences of remittance flows in overwhelmingly economic terms.

This article takes issue with such an approach, arguing for a refocusing of the debate on remittances in recipient societies on the crucially important, yet largely neglected, political realm.

It posits that in formations where a significant aspect of the population relies on external grants for everyday provisioning, questions on the possible implications of their reliance for civic engagement, social citizenship and political allegiance become imperative. The article proposes a conceptual framework for interrogating the effects of the emergence of a discursive 'remittance class' for notions of citizenship, State-society relations, and the changing patterns and forms of identity in African and other remittance-dependent societies.

Nigeria, Africa's most populous country and its largest recipient of workers' remittances, is used to illustrate the argument. Africa; sustainable development; State; authority; globalization. At the heart of this debate has been the contestation over the agency for development. The global wave of democratization that swept through most parts of the developing world in the late s and early s revived this debate on the linkage between globalization, sustainable development and State capacity in Africa.

The fundamental concern of the present paper is whether the exigencies of globalization can be reconciled with democratization and sustainable development. This provokes further questions such as how fragile democratic regimes can improve their prospects for consolidation at a moment when the distributive impact of concurrent programmes of economic liberalization and adjustment are highly contestable.

Are the economic reforms prescribed by the Bretton Woods institutions and bilateral donors compatible with democratization and developmental processes? Finally, the paper examines the relevance, capacity and potentials of the African State as agent of development and partnership in the democratization process.

Discussion à Visées Démocratique et Philosophique (DVDP) sur le thème de la différence, animée par Michel Tozzi avec les élèves du CM2 de l'Ecole La Source à. UNESCO: Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'éducation. La France à l'UNESCO.

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Created inour go here continues to expand worldwide. Our contest seeks to promote chat rencontre en belgique gratuit practice among children and young people around the world, aiming to bring them together around a common international action.

International visual arts competition You [URL] send your entry until the 15th of Januarywe receive entries even if they arrived after this date. This is the deadline to send entries, we can receive them after this day.

The aim of the competition is ou rencontre ton une femme promote the practice of art among children and young people around the world in the hope of uniting them through an 19e rencontres npp unesco activity. The centre therefore reserves the right to use the creations for all practical purposes within the framework of avis forum sites de rencontres belgique activities expositions, presentations, communication mediums, [URL]. The 3 winners of each category will be awarded a medal gold plated, silver plated and solid bronze and a certificate.

The other winners will each receive a bronze medal as well as a certificate. These creations will make up itinerant here which will be circulated around France and abroad. The medal will be sent to the address of the participant and the certificate will 19e rencontres npp unesco sent via standard mail to the same address.

IMAJ- Centre for UNESCO 19e rencontres npp unesco not in any case be held responsible for the loss, theft or damage of packages medals and certificates ; the centre cannot replace nor compensate for theft, loss or damage. Each medal and certificate are unique and only one copy is made. The 19e rencontres npp unesco of these rights takes effect as soon as the prize is awarded. The undersigned will be mentioned as the creator with each usage.

Participants are prohibited from engaging in counterfeiting or plagiarism. The artistic creations must be originals and not be 19e rencontres npp unesco subject of a copy. These 19e rencontres npp unesco are final and will not be the object of any plea, appeal or prosecution by the schools nor the authors.

Click nominees will receive a diploma of honour. All participants will be registered in the Artistic Fund of our Art Library. Remaining days to send your entry: It is divided into 5 age categories, 19e rencontres npp unesco as well as a medical-social category open to children and young people with disability aged from 3 to Only one entry is accepted per individual.

The [EXTENDANCHOR] label must be correctly filled out and secured to the back of each creation glue, avoid to use tape. Labels that are illegible or incorrectly filled out will not be taken visit web page account. The participant might attach an explanatory text onto the creation describing the creative process.

Only creations on a flat surface are accepted no three-dimensional creations and they must be on flexible material unframed, no wood or carton board. The read article dimensions are x 75 cm. The creations must be sent to: Participants who do not respect the above criteria will be disqualified from the competition.

The final date for candidates to send in their entry is 1 5 th January The participant will read article be able to recover his drawing, it will not be sent to him nor will it be able to be taken again. PRIZES The [URL] winners of each category will créer une application de rencontre comme tinder awarded a medal gold plated, silver plated and solid bronze and a certificate.

Nominees will each receive a certificate. The 19e rencontres npp unesco prize can in no case be exchanged for currency or another prize.

L’UNESCO inscrit 19 sites au patrimoine mondial - bookllib100.aberfoodblog.com

Justice pour les membres de Pussy Riots: Lettre au maire de Saguenay, M. Jean Tremblay- Eaton, 12 Jean-Marc Fournier, 11 Beyond VaccinatioN, Protection des droits des plus faibles: Fabuler ou compter, Lettre au Premier ministre Stephen Harper: Manque de jugement, 06 Lettre au Premier Ministre Stephen Harper: Le Canada doit retirer ses troupes de l'Afghanistan Lettre au Premier ministre Jean Charest: Port du casque dans le sport: Lettre au gouverneur de la Banque du Canada, M.

Secourez les caisses de retraite 08 PPP et bien public 08 Lettre au Premier ministre du Canada, M. Contre le projet de loi C Lettre au Conseil de la magistrature du Canada 08 DaviS - Richard Dawkins - Will McGill give precedence to science over obsolete religious rites?

David Levine - Modern medicine vs sorcery and superstitions - Stephen Harper - Lutte au terrorisme: A l'attention de Mme Claudette Jobin. Bush's very first act in office was to issue an executive order to reinstate the Global Gag Rule from the Reagan years.

Here is a testimonial from Montreal on reproductive rights on both sides of Canada-US border: Jobin ; Joel E. Tuesday, December 03, 8: Dr Nafis Sadik Re: Thanks- your NYT reply.

Dear Claudette, Thanks for the very nice picture. I have not read Dr. Glad to learn of it. On the other hand, Dr. Nafis Sadik is an obstetrician. Saturday, November 23, 7: Thank you, dear Dr. Jobin, for your kind evaluation of our and interesting comments and link! I hope you are well. Thanks - your NYT reply. Thanks to you and your colleagues for your reply to Erle C. Ellis on population growth, published last Friday. Do you think Ellis would dare apply his theory to Egypt, for instance?

In , there were about as many Egyptians as there are Canadians today, or 33 millions. Now, including the refugees, they are close to 85 millions and must be fed with imported wheat at inflated prices, just as their oil exporting revenues are drying out — what is consumed by a larger population cannot be exported!

Classical Greece and Rome did the same. Kemp, Scientific American, September I wish to commend you for your vote against M. Now, presenting motion M, M. Many such young women are already forced to enter marriage with an unknown man, prematurely. Thus, many parents are currently undeserving of having daughters and we must first put our minds to protecting those living under unacceptable conditions before looking to facilitate the bringing into this world of new innocent victims.

Should this seem politically incorrect, please consider how the following Canadian experiment in survival in very harsh conditions offers sobering thoughts: Worldwide, millions of girls are poorly, if not criminally treated on a daily basis, as the UN reminded us on Oct. The worsening of the present economic crisis will probably just aggravate the situation. Indeed, the last thing our overpopulated Planet Earth needs is unwanted children! We trust, dear Mrs. May, that you will influence this debate towards more realism as it should not, under the guise of good intentions, make the world a bad place to live for more women, young or not.

Ottawa Ont K2B 7E9 bairdj parl. Justice pour les membres de Pussy Riot. Mme Angela Merkel a une formation scientifique qui lui fait comprendre plus vite que les autres et elle a perdu confiance depuis quelques mois.

The quantitative success your Foundation has attained through vaccination is remarkable and we praise your sustained efforts to this day.

Back in November , your husband was asking in his syndicated column: Since then, humankind has added the equivalent of one full China or 5. This is of course a theoretical view that ecosystemic collapses might well postpone indefinitely. This is not without precedents: However, we know that civilized humans are supposed to act more responsibly. Some optimists have pretended that if children ceased to die and if women got educated, stabilization of the world population would necessarily ensue.

This is not what French Canada experienced! As long as the Catholic religion was taken seriously here, university graduates giving birth to four or more children were not exceptional. The comparison between French-speaking Catholics and Anglo-Protestants living side by side shows what considerable difference in fertility social pressure can make for generations. Taking into account that many traditions expect all women to reproduce which was never the case here, how can you make sure that your interventions do not exacerbate problems?

Dying at two from contagion, or at ten from battlefield wounds, or from complications after being gang raped? If we sound not politically correct, please consider that the Canadian experience offers some terrible lessons on survival in very harsh context.

Kemp Scientific American September With access to modern energy and imported food, the practice stopped, but it is a reminder that one can be left with no easy alternative when forced to live under "triage" conditions. We trust that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will favour lucidity and long term planning and responsibility over unfunded theories and taboos that increase the suffering of innocent victims.

Thank you for having spoken out last February 17 th and helping to prevent Chris Smith from scoring too many points in his utterly irresponsible crusade. Cela n'est pas surprenant, mais cela n'est pas acceptable et vous devez le dire haut et fort! Monsieur le Premier Ministre,. Plaintes sur le recensement: L'avortement tue tous les jours parce que les avortements sont faits dans des conditions catastrophiques.

Pour beaucoup de femmes, l'avortement est un moyen contraceptif. Depuis Lincoln, on ne peut plus invoquer l'Ancien Testament pour justifier l'esclavage chez nos voisins du Sud; mieux, depuis Johnson, on ne peut plus le faire pour exclure en se basant sur la couleur de la peau.

Monsieur le Premier ministre,. Un cas que j'aimerais vous raconter Depuis longtemps nous intervenons pour demander un encadrement qui n'est toujours pas en place.

Le dossier ci-joint en fait foi. Les revendications de la Ligue portent alors principalement sur: De fil en aiguille et de reportages.

Fonction publique et para-publique: Vos tergiversations concernant le port de signes religieux dans la fonction publique et para-publique me scandalisent. Lettre de Johanne Durocher. Merci Mme Jobin pour votre aide. Nous en avons grandement besoin. Depuis maintenant 1 mois personne ne sait ou sont Nathalie et ses enfants. Le gouvernement une fois de temps en temps pose un geste pour avoir l'air de faire quelque chose.

Rapatriez Madame Nathalie Morin et ses trois enfants au Canada. Quand on y pense, la somme de ,